Be Your Own Boss Panel

Our Be Your Own Boss Studio is a partnership between TRiO and Scholars Studio. On October 3rd, millennial entrepreneurs discussed their experiences starting and running their own business. 

 

Our panelists engage in a lively dialogue.

Our panelists engage in a lively dialogue.

Professor Robinson addresses the audience.

Professor Robinson addresses the audience.

A view of the audience.

A view of the audience.

There were lots of aspiring entrepreneurs in the audience.  

There were lots of aspiring entrepreneurs in the audience.

 

BSU TV captured the event.

BSU TV captured the event.

Our scholars had an opportunity to network at the end of the event.

Our scholars had an opportunity to network at the end of the event.

Scholars chat with one of our panelists, a salon owner. 

Scholars chat with one of our panelists, a salon owner. 

Our scholars chat with founder and owner of the monthly subscription company, Femly Box.  

Our scholars chat with founder and owner of the monthly subscription company, Femly Box.

 

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Bulldog Scholar's Academy Closing Events

Presentation of Final Projects

Thursday, August 4, 2:30-5:00 p.m.

Location: Ballroom B&C

The Reading and Critical Inquiry (RCI) component of Freshmen Seminar is designed to nurture creative scientists of the world: students who are careful observers, deep thinkers, powerful analysts, effective team members, and innovative designers of the future. We believe that developing these attributes will help students be more successful in their college careers and in their lives. We also believe that encouraging such behavior will cultivate leaders who can change the world for the better.

RCI asks students to interrogate what they know about themselves and the world through a series of organizing questions regarding self, purpose, positioning, and the languages of inquiry. RCI promotes an examination of individuals, communities, and the world that allows for multiple perspectives and multidimensionality.

 The project is a three-dimensional representation of what students have come to understand through their work in class, supplemental instruction, labs, and co-curricular activities. The project demonstrates that the group has reflected on the following questions: How do we read the world? What is critical thinking? How does language help us think, understand, and demonstrate our understanding? What role does self-understanding play in critical thinking? How do we engage matters of time and space?

Closing Ceremony

Saturday, August 6, TBA

Location: TBA

The closing ceremony is a celebration of the students’ accomplishments. A continental breakfast will be provided and scholarships will be awarded.

Bulldog Scholar's Academy: Week 3 in Review

Finals Week

Next week is finals week. We have decided to postpone our weekend trip to Harpers Ferry to give students additional time to study for exams. Tutors and mentors will be available all weekend to  assist. It is important for all students to complete their online homework and quizzes. Doing so will help them score higher on exams. 

A Look at Week Three

Thanks to everyone who braved the heat to join us for our family barbecue. We had lots of food, games, and good company. Here are a few highlights:

Monica Turner, Bulldog Scholar's Academy Coordinator and Director of Scholar's Studio and TRiO/Student Support Services, greeted guests.

Monica Turner, Bulldog Scholar's Academy Coordinator and Director of Scholar's Studio and TRiO/Student Support Services, greeted guests.

The heat didn't deter our student athletes.

The heat didn't deter our student athletes.

Our mentors engaged in a friendly game of tug-of-war.

Our mentors engaged in a friendly game of tug-of-war.

Our pre-calculus tutor, Muna, tested the obstacle course.

Our pre-calculus tutor, Muna, tested the obstacle course.

Our Resident Director, Edna, and Supplemental Instructor, Bunmi, prepared cotton candy.

Our Resident Director, Edna, and Supplemental Instructor, Bunmi, prepared cotton candy.

Friday Night's Spoken Word

Our mentors hosted an open mic in the Fine and Performing Arts Center's black box theater. They showcased a range of talent, from spoken word to rap and vocals. Here are a few images from the event:

Bulldog Scholar's Academy: Week 2 in Review

Course Work

The scholars are moving quickly through the summer session. Most participants have taken their first math exam and all are reading their second book in Freshman Seminar/Critical Reading and Inquiry. We have received reports that most students did well on their first exam. Scholars have access to at least five hours of tutoring and supplemental instruction daily, two of which are mandatory. Students with averages below 75 are required to attend drop-in tutoring. With adequate effort, strong instruction, and support we believe all our scholars can be successful. 

Harriet Tubman Bus Tour

Students and staff stand in front the the Dorchester County Courthouse on the second stop of the tour.

Students and staff stand in front the the Dorchester County Courthouse on the second stop of the tour.

On Saturday, July 16th we traveled Cambridge, Maryland where Harriet Tubman spent 1/3 of her life. The tour commenced at the Dorchester County Visitor's Center, which has dedicated an entire floor to Tubman's legacy. We stopped at the Dorchester County Courthouse where Tubman's niece, Kessiah, and her two daughters escaped the auction block in 1850; visited the Harriet Tubman museum; and wound through the countryside, past the Bucktown Village Store--where Tubman was struck in the head --and Scotts Chapel--where Tubman and her family may have worshipped. We ended the tour with a stop at the Transquaking River--where enslaved Africans often hid in the reeds as they began their journey on the Underground Railroad--and the Brodess Farm where Tubman spent her early years.

Enslaved Africans hid in the reeds along the Transquaking River until it was safe to escape. The landscape in this area hasn't changed significantly since Tubman's time.

Enslaved Africans hid in the reeds along the Transquaking River until it was safe to escape. The landscape in this area hasn't changed significantly since Tubman's time.

A few locals were crabbing when we stopped at the Transquaking River. They showed off their basket full of blue crabs.

A few locals were crabbing when we stopped at the Transquaking River. They showed off their basket full of blue crabs.

Students and staff pause for a photo at the former site of the Brodess Farm. It's likely that Harriet Tubman stood on this spot.

Students and staff pause for a photo at the former site of the Brodess Farm. It's likely that Harriet Tubman stood on this spot.

Family Barbecue Update

The Family Barbecue is quickly approaching. Please register online if you haven't done so already. Each student may invite up to three guestshttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/639V9MP

The barbecue will be held from 4:00-8:00 pm. on Saturday, July 23rd at the Goodloe House. Only participants and registered guests will be allowed on site. Please park in the lot behind the Student Center. A shuttle will pick up guests every 15 minutes beginning at 3:45. 

Bulldog Scholar's Academy: Week 1 in Review

Our theme this summer is "disruption." Scholars are exploring what it means to disrupt systems and practices that perpetuate injustice and prevent individuals from standing in their truth. The Freshman Seminar/Critical Reading and Inquiry course provides a launching point for this investigation. Intended to "disrupt" traditional notions of learning, the course challenges students to consider who they are becoming through discussions, hands-on activities, and texts--ranging from Greek plays and prize-winning books to Twitter feeds and the night's sky. 

Co-curricular Activities: Smithsonian Planetarium

The academic week kicked off with a trip to the Planetarium at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. The scholars watched two shows that brought to light the universe's vastness and potential. Students will continue thinking about the stars metaphorically as they consider the possibilities available to them in college and beyond.

Extra-curricular Activities

The week's activities concluded on Saturday with a trip to Richmond, Virginia's Trail of Enslaved Africans. This trip, the first of three African American history tours, was both emotionally challenging and a reminder of their ancestor's strength. Students spent the latter part of the day relaxing at King's Dominion. 

Trail of Enslaved Africans Tour with Elegba Folklore Society

Trail of Enslaved Africans Tour with Elegba Folklore Society

What's Next? Week 2 Preview

By now the scholars are settled into their courses. Tutors/Supplemental Instructors are available throughout the day to help with math and reading. Students have an array of activities available to them outside of class, including fitness classes, yoga, basketball, African dance,  workshops, and movie nights. 

This Saturday the scholars will travel to Cambridge, Maryland to learn about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. The afternoon will begin at the Dorchester County Visitor's Center's  and continue with a bus tour that traces Tubman's footsteps in the Cambridge area.

Family Barbecue

The following week we will host our family barbecue. We invite you to join us on Saturday, August 23, 4:00-8:00 p.m. If you haven't done so already, please register online. Each student may bring up to three guests: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/639V9MP .

Contact Information

If you need to reach program staff, please call one of the numbers below:

Monica Turner
(301)860-3296
mturner@bowiestate.edu

Lisa Nardi
(301)860-3297
lnardi@bowiestate.edu

Alex Haley Residence Hall Front Desk
(301)860-4259